Nota Bene: Seneca – On the Philosopher’s Seclusion

Lucius-Annaeus-Seneca

As to the course which I seem to you to be urging on you now and then, my object in shutting myself up and locking the door is to be able to help a greater number. I never spend a day in idleness; I appropriate even a part of the night for study. I do not allow time for sleep but yield to it when I must, and when my eyes are wearied with waking and ready to fall shut, I keep them at their task.

I have withdrawn not only from men, but from affairs, especially from my own affairs; I am working for later generations, writing down some ideas that may be of assistance to them. There are certain wholesome counsels, which may be compared to prescriptions of useful drugs; these I am putting into writing; for I have found them helpful in ministering to my own sores, which, if not wholly cured, have at any rate ceased to spread.

– excerpt, Letters from a Stoic – Letter VIII: “On the Philosopher’s Seclusion”

Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist